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degrees in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. in the u.s., 76% of all registered -- from the top, from the top 10% producing. they come from foreign students. foreign students here in the u.s. who then become inventors. these foreign-born inventors are driving economic prosperity with the consequences of their background in these hard sciences. in our current system, we welcome foreign students to the united states. we provide them the world's best education, and then we send them home so that they can compete against us. and, frankly, this makes no sense. america's current involvement in asia must not be confined by the same old approaches that may have once served a purpose, but for now woefully outdated. indeed, we must harness the full potential of american ingenuity to address the spectrum of challenges we have before us. and this is out build samsung in the aftermath of the korean war. and much like the mythical phoenix rising from the ashes, south korea and samsung are today truly world class. together, we can ensure that the future legacy of ame
a colleague here in congress brush off the warnings of science about climate change, saying, "god's still up there," implying that there's no need to worry about climate change. well, if god is still up there, what better use of the gifts of moral reasoning that we have been given as his people than to protect his creation and one another from harm? madam president, as we sing in the old hymn, "field and forest, veil and mountain, flowering meadow, flashing sea, chanting bird and flowing fountain call us to rejoice in thee." we are each called in our own way to wake up and to do the right thing. i yield the floor. mr. nelson: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from florida. mr. nelson: madam president, i just want to comment on the senator from rhode island's comments. first of all, i know it's so heartfelt and so genuine, and i want to thank him for that. and i want to thank him from approaching it from a faith-based standpoint about this fragile ecosystem that we live on called planet earth. and he's brought a perspective with that chart that he had of the earth that it is
, however, the public generally views these space activities as little more than interesting science projects if they know about them at all. yet without them americans' lives would fundamentally change. let me explain with a few brief examples. gps is with the internet one of only two global utilities. it facilitates, for example, having emergency response vehicles reach their destinations by the shortest routes, potentially saving lives, for transoceanic air travel to be safer and more efficient because planes can fly closer together. and if the new satellite-reliant air traffic control system is implemented, reduce jet fuel consumption by one million barrels annually saving both money and the environment, and it saves the trucking industry an estimated $53 billion annually in fuel costs and better fleet management. in addition to the economic benefits of space which are vital to the national interest, there are also direct security implications. politically the recent meteor right that hit the russian yules with the force of an atomic bomb was a stark wake-up call regarding threat
nutrition assistance because of sequester. national science grants cut, is,000 of them. 902 million cut from loans to our small businesses who are the job creators. and even 1 240*u f.b.i,000 f.b.d other law enforcement personnel. so, yes, i say to my friend who is not here -- who is leading the filibuster, the senator from kansas -- i hope he comes and shows up -- i hear him. i feel the pain he feels. i feel the pain he feels for a his state. i have a list that i won't bore you with that shows the cuts to my state. it is painful. but how do you solve it? not by amendment after amendment after amendment on a must-pass bill that the house has said, keep it simple or the government shuts down. not that way. but by turning to the democratic budget. where senator murray and the colleagues there have restored those cuts and they won't other ways to cut, better ways to cut, sensible ways to cut. so i call on my friends on the other side of the aisle, if you want to waste 10 hours, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 hours, it is your call. we will be here. but we are not going to put off the passage of the
're on the brink of incredible breakthroughs in neurological science that could help either find the cure for alzheimer's or do the cognitive stretchout. we've got to spend money to save money. let's put the money into research, let's deal with alzheimer's, parkinson's, lou gehrig's disease, the things that break the family budget, break the family's heart, and also contribute to our public debt. but we can get there if we make wise and prudent choices. most of the people in nursing homes are really primarily women over the age of 80. and what are we going to do? are we going to abandon them? so, mada mr. president, this but is unkind to women. but its also unkind -- and children -- in terms of the opportunity structure. the ryan budget caps and freezes pell grants at $5,645. it requires frame families thate less than $25,000 to qualify for a pell grant. that means that if you're -- many people who seek pell grants are single mothers, and there's recent data out that shows so many of our families now -- 63% -- are in single-parent house holes and it can be a single mother or single dad bu
graders. the program's goal is to motivate these students to explore science, technology, engineering and math as they continue their education. military volunteers apply abstract principles to real-world situations by leading tours and giving lectures on the use of stem in different settings and careers. i'm sure that's a nice thing to happen. i'm sure that star base is -- it's nice that fifth graders are able to hear from members of the military. meanwhile, we can't deploy an aircraft carrier. with a war going on, a budget crisis at our doorstep, this is how we elect to spend our taxpayers' defense money. another example is $11.3 million in increase for the civil air program or c.a.p. c.a.p. is a volunteer organization that provides aerospace education to young people, runs a junior cadet program and assists when possible to providing emergency services. its members are hard working, we are grateful for their volunteerism. this year as in the past, the senate armed services committee authorized the president's request for c.a.p. funding. however, c.a.p. is an auxiliary and this shou
is not rocket science in terms of identifying what the issues are. there are two issues here, mr. president. one of them is taxes, and the other is medicare. and the two of them, in fact, are inextricably linked in many respects because i've heard some on the other side of the aisle say i'll look at ways to reform taxes if colleagues on the democratic side will look at ways to protect medicare and at the same time hold down its cost. and we've heard other senators say the reverse. and so these issues are really inextricably linked. and one of the reasons that i support this budget this evening, mr. president, is that i think this budget provides significant space, significant space for democrats and republicans as this process goes forward to produce bipartisan solutions on those two issues, the tax question and the medicare issue in the days ahead. and let me take just a few minutes. senator coats talked about our bipartisan efforts. i've had a chance really for the last five years to work with two very thoughtful conservative republicans, senator coats and our former colleague, senator gregg,
with all the breakthroughs of new science and technology. and it is virtually impossible to get people in washington, d.c. to actually learn how to think about a new world. and i commend all of you -- [applause] -- to go to gingrich productions.com. you'll see a newsletter entitled highness of the future versus prisoners of the past. it captures exactly where we are. we stand today on the edge of a great future, but washington is in both parties. now, i want to ask in part to help us find the pioneers of the future. when you see new ideas, new approaches, new developments, let us know at gingrich production. will try to develop a new university. courses can we love you to either take a course or offer a course or create a workshop. that starts with what reince priebus is doing it is deeper and longer and broader and includes public policy as well as techniques and technology. but we need your help. this is literally a 50 year struggle. october 2719 safety for ronald reagan, national television, you and i are told increasingly we have to choose between a left and a right. well, i would
of it for strategic investments in education and science, r&d, you know, moving the economy. and a third to prefund the liability for social security for the next 75 years. imagine if we had done that. instead, what happened was the surplus was put into a huge supply-side tax cut benefiting, as we know now, the wealthiest in the country, adding to a situation where the wealthy have gotten wealthiest and wealthiest in the last decade and the middle class has shrunk and shrunk and there are more and more people just struggling today. so it's all put into a large tax cut. and then we proceeded to go into two wars that weren't paid for, medicare prescription drug plan not paid for, and nothing else paid for, for a decade, and we ended up with the largest deficit in the history of this country. and that's what this president walked into and that's what we have been faced with. now, when we look at where the debt has come from and why it's important that we focus on the economy, we know that the biggest piece of where the debt came from was the tax cuts geared to wealthiest americans, what has been famou
. the national science foundation funds lots of great scientific endeavors in this country. as a matter of fact, they have about four times as many applications for grants as they have money to give out. but they spend a considerable amount of money doing such things as funding -- quote -- "research in political science." in 2008 they spent $10.8 million. $10.9 in 2009, $10.8 million in 2011 and $10.1 million in 2012. what this amendment does is prohibits the national science foundation from wasting federal resources on political science projects and redirects that to other areas with n.s.f. that's going to give the american people a much greater return on their investment. let me give you some examples of what they're funding. campaigns and elections, citizen support in emerging and established democracies, bargaining processes, electoral choice, democratizeization, political change and regime transitions. all important things if we weren't in a budget crisis and a spending crisis. but tell me whether or not you'd rather have the next new computer chip generation developed through a grant at t
, we have one somewhere else i can't remember. $2.6 billion. science, technology, education and math. we all agree it's important. the pentagon has over 100 programs. the pentagon itself has over 100 programs. and then we have another 105 or so programs spread across the rest of the agencies. 13 different agencies have a science, technology and engineering. why is that in the department of education? as i finish this, i won't go to the next chart just on the basis of time. i just outlined a whole bunch of different programs, not one of them has a metric on it that says we're successful or unsuccessful. not one of them. each of these agencies have multiple programs run across multiple organizations. what we have discovered on job training is that we're real good in job training with federal programs of employing people in job training. we're terrible in terms of giving them a life skill that will give them a lifetime work capability. let me take a short time to show you some examples. you can see why we have such big charts. here are the federal preschool and daycare programs. so if y
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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